Islam, Jihad, and ISIS

Nabeel Qureshi was raised in a devout and loving Muslim home, but during his college years he began to closely examine Islamic teachings along with the claims of Christianity. As a result, Nabeel committed his life to Jesus Christ, a dramatic and engaging story he told in the New York Times bestselling and award-winning memoir, Seeking Allah, Finding Jesus.

Answering Jihad: A Better Way Forward, is Qureshi’s just-released book, rushed to press in the wake of the growing global concern over the threats and actions of Muslim extremists. This is Part 3 of a 4-part interview with Qureshi, currently studying Judaism and Christianity at Oxford, pursuing his doctorate in New Testament studies.
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Islam and Muslims

This is the second of a four-part interview with Nabeel Qureshi, author of the New York Times bestselling book, Seeking Allah, Finding Jesus. Qureshi's newest book, Answering Jihad: A Better Way Forward, releases March 8.

Are there different kinds of followers of Islam?

Muslims interpret Muhammad’s teachings very differently, often along partisan lines of authoritative interpreters and cultural boundaries. That is why, in very broad strokes, Shia Islam looks different from Sunni Islam, why Bosnian Islam looks different from Saudi Islam, why folk Islam in the outlands of Yemen looks different from scholarly Islam in the halls of Al-Azhar University in Cairo. Although the core of Islam is centered on the person of Muhammad in seventh century Arabia, the expression of Islam reflects local customs.

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Answering Jihad Part 1

Nabeel Qureshi was raised in a devout and loving Muslim home, but during his college years he began to closely examine Islamic teachings along with the claims of Christianity. As a result, Nabeel committed his life to Jesus Christ, a dramatic and engaging story he told in the New York Times bestselling and award-winning memoir, Seeking Allah, Finding Jesus.

Answering Jihad: A Better Way Forward, is Qureshi’s just-released book, rushed to press in the wake of the growing global concern over the threats and actions of Muslim extremists. This is Part 1 of a 4-part interview with Qureshi, currently studying Judaism and Christianity at Oxford, pursuing his doctorate in New Testament studies.

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Why Jesus Matters

There’s a great God debate going on right now, about whether Christians and Muslims worship the same God. This isn’t a new discussion, but it’s moved to the front burner because both Christianity and Islam are on the front burner. We think it’s great. Anytime God makes the headlines, only good can come of it.

One particular episode in this debate that caught our attention was the case of Wheaton College political science professor Larycia Hawkins, who posted a picture of herself wearing a hijab (a veil worn by some Muslim women) in solidarity with Muslims. Wheaton, a conservative Christian college sometimes called the “Harvard of Christian schools,” was okay with the hijab. But when Hawkins commented on her post that Christians and Muslims “worship the same God,” she was suspended for going against Wheaton’s statement of faith.

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The Meaning of Advent

One of the great joys of Christmas is the arrival of special guests. It may be a son or daughter who has been away at college or in the military. It could be a favorite aunt or uncle who has flown in for the holidays. Friends might be coming to share a holiday dinner. Whoever it is, you anticipate the arrival of your guests and prepare yourself and your home for their coming. And finally, when you hear the knock or the doorbell, you jump up, eager to welcome your loved ones into your heart and home.

That spirit and emotion are at the heart of Advent, a way of celebrating Christmas that may be new to you. Perhaps you’re aware of Advent but don’t know a lot about what it means or what you’re supposed to do about it. When you hear the word, you probably think of candles and calendars. While those are often involved in the celebration, they are merely symbols of what Advent is all about.

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What Does God Look Like?

I’ve been thinking about God lately, but not like I usually do. Normally I think about who God is, what He does, what He has written, that kind of stuff. But lately I’ve been thinking about what God looks like. I know, you’re not supposed to do that.

Besides that commandment about not making an image of God in any form, the Bible tells us God is spirit, so there’s no physicality to Him. All of the talk in Scripture about God’s eyes, feet, hands, arms, etc. are anthropomorphisms. It’s the writers applying human traits to God so we better understand Him. But in no way is that to suggest that God has a physical body. Still, we humans can’t help but try to imagine what God looks like. And that’s not necessarily a bad thing.

Artists have been portraying God for centuries, the most famous being Michelangelo’s gigantic creation painting on the ceiling of the Sistine Chapel, where God’s finger is touching Adam’s finger. God is old and white-haired and pretty buff.

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The End of the World?

Throughout history there have been different “signs” that pointed to the end of the world. At least that’s how people (and by “people” we mean wacky futurists) have often interpreted them. For example:
  • In 1774, the Shakers came to America from England because they believed the thousand-year reign of Christ (called the millennium) was imminent. The Shakers were “fanatically anti-sex “ (no matter they built such great furniture), which was consistent with their end-of-the-world beliefs. After all, procreation doesn’t mean all that much if the world is coming to an end.
  • In 1970 Hal Lindsey’s prophetic guide to end times, The Late Great Planet Earth, was first published. Lindsey never actually set a date for the end of the world, but his book suggested it would take place before 1988, or forty years after Israel became a nation. The book sold ten million copies in the 1970s alone.
  • In 1978, Jim Jones ordered members of his cult to commit suicide because “it was time.” Tragically, more than 900 hundred people drank the Kool Aid.
  • In 1988 thousands of people bough a booklet entitled 88 Reasons Why Jesus Will Return in 1988. The book went out of print on January 1, 1989, and the author hasn’t been heard from since (big surprise).
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My Goal in Every Conversation with Mormons

The following post first appeared on Stand to Reason.

Last week some Mormon missionaries showed up at my door. I was unavailable at that moment, so we set up an appointment for them to come back next week. I’m looking forward to the conversation, but I don’t anticipate much impact…in that single conversation. After years of dialoguing with Mormons, I’ve learned to take it slow. Indeed, ex-Mormons will tell you that a patient approach is the best one. 

Think about the Mormons you know. Most of them probably grew up in the LDS Church. Their parents are Mormons. Their family members are Mormons. Most of their close friends are Mormon. The LDS church plays a preeminent role in their life, touching every area. With this in mind, is it realistic to expect Mormons to abandon their faith after one or two conversations? Probably not. That’s an unrealistic goal. 

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Moses and the Tent of Meeting

The third and final post in the series on Moses’ supernatural encounters with God is a personal favorite in scripture.

Moses and God Upon Mount Sinai

In the last post, and first of a series of 3 on Moses and the supernatural encounters he had with God, we looked at the story of the burning bush.

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