EMAIL THIS PAGE       PRINT       RSS      

Consider Jesus

You who share in a heavenly calling, consider Jesus…

Tucked into the Letter to the Hebrews are two words that provide the highest calling and most compelling mandate a Christian can have. These words comprise the central theme of Hebrews and perhaps the entire Bible. They also serve as a guide for living.

Consider Jesus.

We know Jesus, at least in the sense of knowing who he is: God’s only Son sent to earth to bring light and life and salvation to people living in darkness.

Consider Jesus.

But what do we do with Jesus? Once we have put our trust in Him and accepted Him, how do we live? Is there more to a relationship with the Son of God than trust and acceptance? We call ourselves Christians because of a relationship to Jesus, but have we truly considered Him? What does that even mean?

Consider Jesus.

Andrew Murray, the 19th century South African pastor and writer, provides insight into these two words. In his devotional exposition of Hebrews, The Holiest of All, Murray explains that the word consider comes from a root Latin word that means, “to contemplate the stars.” Picture an astronomer patiently and intently gazing into the heavens to discover all that can possibly be known of the stars. That’s what it means to consider something.

Consider Jesus.

Various translations of the Bible bring more texture to these two words:

  • Fix your thoughts on Jesus (NIV)
  • Think carefully about this Jesus (NLT)
  • Take a good hard look at Jesus (MSG)

Have we done this? It’s one thing—a very important thing—to believe in Jesus, trust Him and accept Him. But don’t we often treat Jesus as just another component, another feature in our lives? We know who He is. We proclaim loyalty and love to Him. But do we consider Jesus? Do we search for Him with intensity as an ongoing part of our lives?

Consider Jesus.

Today is a day called Epiphany, or Three Kings Day. In the church calendar, January 6 is the day the “Magi from the east” arrived in Jerusalem after following the star so they could worship “the one who has been born king of the Jews” (Matthew 2:1-12). The Magi were ancient astronomers who gazed intently, saw the star and followed it, traveling from Persia to Jerusalem with gifts suited for royalty.

Consider Jesus.

May we consider Jesus with full devotion as the Magi did, as God intends for us to do. “Gaze upon Him, contemplate Him,” advises Murray. “For some increased knowledge of the stars what devotion, what enthusiasm, what sacrifices are oftentimes witnessed. Oh let the study and possession of the Son of God waken our devotion and our enthusiasm, that we may be able to tell others what beauty and what glory there is in Jesus.

Consider Jesus.

»  Become a Fan or Friend of this Blogger
About
Stan's entire life has been wrapped in content: selling, writing and publishing books and resources that help ordinary people capture a glimpse of extraordinary things.